Aged care explained

DailyCare helps you make the best choice possible with no-nonsense information on care for older people in Australia. 

Everyone’s care needs are different. As we get older, we may need a bit of extra help around the home, or we may need expert care full time. 

We help older Australians and their families along the aged care journey with clear descriptions and expert advice about who, why and what you need to know, every step of the way.

The big topics

Dementia care
Access to information on care, ranging from occasional home-based help through to expert residential aged care

Respite care
Providing a break from usual care arrangements, from in-home relief for caregivers to a short stay in care accommodation for those being cared for

Palliative care
Helping people maintain quality of life even as they near the end, with home-based palliative care, and dedicated care in residential aged care

Consumer directed care
Explaining the funding models for in-home aged care services, with information about accessing a home care package, and advice about how to spend your home care package budget

Aged care assessments
For government-subsidised aged care, we explain how to arrange a free Aged Care Assessment, and describe Centrelink’s horrible Income and Assets Assessment form

Power of attorney
There are several ways of allowing trusted people to help you or act on your behalf, including making them nominees, guardians or granting power of attorney. See how these might help in a home care and residential aged care context.

In-home care

Home Care Packages: Is it worth the wait?

With wait times of up to a year, many people find that they need to fund their own care at home while they’re waiting.

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Applying for funding support

The government makes a subsidy available to some people who need home care. Known as a Home Care Package, the amount you could receive is based on an assessment of your personal care needs and financial situation.

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Choosing and switching home care

Under the Consumer Directed Care model, you choose who provides your care, and you work with them to develop your individual care plan. Depending on where you live and the level of care you need, you’ll probably have a choice of care providers.

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Types of care available in your home

There are many benefits to staying in your home for as long as possible.To support this, there are lots of different types of home care available.

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Spending your home care package

Once you’ve matched your care needs to a provider, and your package becomes available, the money in your Home Care Package (known as HACC in WA) is paid to the provider directly by the government. You’ll get monthly statements with all the details, but you don’t have to worry about...

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Power of attorney

Some aspects of aged care can be complicated, and it can be helpful to have a family member or friend help you.

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Dementia and home care

If you or a loved one has had a dementia diagnosis, it can be helpful to understand the support that’s available to you. While dementia is deeply upsetting, there are still lots of things you can do to continue living a fruitful and happy life.

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Respite care

Home-based respite care is available to support you and your regular carer. If you receive care from a friend or family member, respite care means that – for a short period of time – somebody else takes on the caring duties.

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Transitional home care after hospital

Post-operative or transitional home care helps people move back home faster after a stay in hospital.

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End of life and palliative care at home

While it’s not an option for everyone, more people than ever are choosing to die in their own homes, surrounded by family, friends and memories.

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Diversity and home care

Everyone in Australia has equal access to the care services provided or funded by the government. So whether you’re from a particular cultural, language or religious background, or part of the diverse LGBTI community, there are home care options available to you.

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Caring for multiple people at once

As a carer, you may feel like you’re being pulled in lots of different directions. Being the primary carer for someone is a big job, so it goes without saying that looking after more than one person can increase the demands being put on you.This is a common scenario for...

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Planning in case of an emergency

IMPORTANT: If you’re here because there is an emergency, stop and call triple zero (000). They will be able to assist you in the emergency and how to provide first aid.

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Carer’s need care too

Self-care is a bit of a buzzword these days, but that’s because we all need it. Carers especially are in a role which prioritises the wellbeing of others, with their time and attention spent looking after someone else.

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On your own during the holidays?

You’re not being a Grinch if the thought of Christmas doesn’t fill you with joy. The big holidays, specifically the ones focused on family togetherness such as Christmas and Easter, can be a challenging time for many people.

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5 things you can do to keep your mind sharp

You’ve wandered into the kitchen and can’t recall what you wanted or how you got there. You’re always losing your keys and don’t quite know what day it is. If this sounds like you, be reassured that at least you’re not alone.

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Adjusting to having an outside carer in the home

Welcoming someone over for a visit is one thing, but getting used to an outside carer being a regular presence in your home is another. There will no doubt be an adjustment period as you get to know each other and understand the way you both like to do things.

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Caring for someone with changing behaviours

It’s all about planning.Providing care in the privacy of the home is one thing, but there will be times when you need to do so in public. This can provoke anxiety in some people, who may be worried that the person they care for may not be able to cope...

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How to tell when someone needs help at home (and how to approach it)

It’s not easy to ask for help, especially when we might not even realise we need it. That’s why family and friends can play a crucial role when determining if someone needs a little bit of a hand around the home.

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The benefits of living at home for people with dementia

A diagnosis of dementia is upsetting for the person receiving the news, and also for their loved ones.It signals the beginning of a difficult time of life; a time of change and upheaval. But people living with one of the various forms of dementia, don’t have to deal with the...

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The carer interview process

Once you’ve decided to get a bit of help at home, there are several steps you need to go through before the 'interview' process starts. It isn’t complicated but can take some time, so it’s best to get started as soon as possible.While each provider is slightly different, here is...

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Did you know your Home Care Package covers this?

Let’s face it, there’s nothing like having some money to spend on yourself tomake life a lot more enjoyable! Which is why striking gold with an in-home carepackage means it’s time to dream a little and start imagining how those prettypennies can help you help yourself! And while you can’t...

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Palliative care in the home

A good death is all anyone hopes for at the end of a good life. A death that is peaceful and loving, surrounded by family in a place that feels comfortable and familiar. But how do you manage that, for yourself or a family member, if a high level of...

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The carer- client relationship

If you ask Koula what it was like meeting 72 year-old Reggie for the first time, she’s very diplomatic. ‘It was…interesting!’ she laughs. Reggie himself is more expansive, ‘Come on, I was a curmudgeon. I got very cross that she was early and I didn’t even offer her a cup...

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Let’s talk incontinence

Ooops! Well, that was unexpected…Loss of bladder control – urinary incontinence – is extremely common, especially in women (thanks a lot, childbirth). Almost 5 million Australians experience unexpected spills of urine (discretely referred to as ‘leakage’). That’s around one in 5 people.

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Hacks to get you out of the house

As the weather cools, the sun goes into hiding and the days get shorter, it can be harder to leave the comfort of your cosy home. But getting out is just as important in the colder months; even more so if you’re prone to seasonal affective disorder (fittingly called SAD),...

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What are your options while waiting for your package?

Home Care Packages provide help with the costs of in-home care. And while everyone who qualifies on medical grounds is granted a package, the government only releases a limited number of packages at a time, meaning that even if you’re approved, you’ll likely have to wait before using it.If you...

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Questions to ask when researching home care providers

Researching different home care providers takes time, but you may have time on your hands if you’re waiting for your funding allocation to come through. Compile a list of questions you can ask each provider, in order to compare and make the best choice for you.

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What are the costs of in-home care?

Your mind is made up: you want to keep living at home. It’s a choice that lots of older Australians are making, and the government is backing them up, with a range of subsidies for in-home care services (although of course, the bureaucratic manoeuvres can be burdensome and the wait...

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How to look after yourself in your home

There are many benefits to staying in your own home, yet it can be easy to let things slide. Here are some tips on how to look after yourself:

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What to do if you are unhappy with your home care

It can happen: despite the best of intentions and careful case management, you’ve become unhappy with your home carer or other services that make up your home care package. Or maybe the problem is bigger than that, and you’ve lost faith in your provider altogether.

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Thinking of switching home care providers?

Since the Government changed to the Consumer Directed Care (CDC) model for home care early last year, it’s been possible to change care providers whenever you like. Consumer Directed Care means the funding package is in your hands, so if you choose to change providers, any unspent funds follow you...

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What is case management and what can it do for you?

Under the Consumer Directed Care model, your Home Care Package is yours to spend as you like. You choose a home care provider, and you advise them on the support services you want to spend your budget on.

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How to maintain your quality of life

How to feel satisfied & fulfilled

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How to avoid a fall at home

Ageing brings with it plenty of unwanted ailments. And while we can’t predict what might affect us in the future, we do know that our bodies will become increasingly frail over time. It can be a gradual process that goes unnoticed however, that is until a fall in the home...

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How to get a job in the aged care industry

Working in the aged care industry is a great way to make a difference in the lives of others. It’s also a career not limited by age, so don’t worry if you’re well past the school-leaving stage.

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Managing medications at home

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Residential aged care

How to compare and choose aged care homes

For many, choosing an aged care home comes down to budget.But even if a home has higher fees than you can afford, there might be room to negotiate.

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Waiting lists, signing up and moving in

Many aged care homes have waiting lists. When vacancies become available, they are allocated according to care requirements, urgency, time spent on the waiting list and suitability.If you land a place in an aged care home, it’s important to be organised. Some details you need to have include:

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Care and services

Residential aged care homes offer you a certain level of care, covered by the fees you have agreed to pay.

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How to get into an aged care home

Many aged care homes have waiting lists. When vacancies become available, they are allocated according to care requirements, urgency, time spent on the waiting list and suitability.If you land a place in an aged care home, it’s important to be organised. You’ll need:

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Assessments and government subsidies

Residential aged care costs are pretty complicated. There are forms and assessments and jargon and bureaucracy, but there are also people who can help, and – in the end – most people qualify for government financial support to pay some or all of the costs of care.

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How much is residential care?

Depending on your personal financial situation and your choice of aged care home, residential aged care can range from very expensive through to heavily subsidised. For your protection, there are annual and lifetime limits (known as caps) on the amount you pay (this doesn’t apply if you’re paying the full...

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Transitional residential care after hospital

After a stay in a hospital, some people need a bit of extra care and support. Transitional care is available and can be offered both in the person’s own home or – if their care needs are greater – in a ‘live-in’ environment such as a hostel or residential aged...

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Power of attorney

When you enter a residential aged care home, it can make life easier and more enjoyable if you have someone to help you with decisions about your money and medical issues.

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Dementia

People with a dementia diagnosis find that some aspects of their daily lives become gradually more and more difficult. While there are many ways to receive dementia care and support while living in your own home, sometimes staying at home is not practical.

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Respite care

Respite care gives caregivers and those being cared for a break from their usual care arrangements and includes anything from a short stay in care accommodation to help at home on a regular basis.

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End of life and palliative care in a home

The support offered by experienced carers in a residential aged care setting can make a person’s final weeks and days more comfortable and fulfilling. Drawing on advice from professional carers and nursing staff can also mean that family members and loved ones understand what is happening, and what services are available.

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Diversity in residential care

In Australia, it is illegal to discriminate on the grounds of race, religion or sexuality, and everyone here has equal access to care services provided or financially supported by the government. So whether you’re from a particular cultural, language or religious background, or part of the diverse LGBTI community, there...

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5 things to know BEFORE moving into residential aged care

It’s a big decision, and it’s natural to hesitate for a moment and wonder what to do next. If you’re considering going into aged care, take some time to have a good think about how to proceed.Here are the 5 things you should get your head around before you get going.

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Aged care costs and charges: a complete guide

One of the first things you’re going to discover when you start researching residential care is that there’s a maze of costs and charges to get your head around. It’s complicated at first, but once you understand the basics you’ll be in a good place to start making some decisions.To...

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Ways to pay for residential aged care

It’s no surprise that residential aged care is expensive, not to mention a bit complicated. Of course, in almost all cases the costs are worth it: it’s not just room and board, but a high level of professional care within a ready-made community of residents.

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How to find the right aged care home for you

Some decisions in life are hard to make, but the outcomes are not that important. Other decisions are more significant, yet not necessarily harder. Selecting the right aged care home doesn’t need to be difficult.Figuring out what you’re after in a home and making an educated decision will help find...

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Adjusting to living in residential care

Moving house is a time of big upheaval, none more so than when you move into a completely different environment. Aged care homes increasingly have a lot to offer, butthere’s no doubt that the transition to residential care can be challenging.Here are some tips on how you can better adjust...

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What is living in an aged care home really like?

What do you think of when you think about aged care facilities? If you’re like most people, chances are the words summon up visions of stern-faced nurses pacing under buzzing fluorescent lighting and tutting about spilled tea. Thankfully, modern aged care doesn’t have much in common with this dreary vision.

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Living in aged care and loving it! Our top 5 reasons to move in and start living it up

While living in an aged care home may not have been something you envisioned for yourself or for your loved ones, there are some huge benefits to making the move to a facility that is all about making life easy.

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How to tell when your loved one is ready for an aged care home

It’s not all that often that an elderly parent asks their child to start looking into aged care facilities. The fact is that the decision to move mum or dad into a home generally comes after some sort of physical or mental decline that jolts the family into action.

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DailyCare is a True Aged Care Guide

Help is at hand when choosing the best care solution

Finding the right care can be one of the most challenging decisions we need to make as we get older. At such an emotional time, it’s easy to be confused by the many options, and making the wrong decision could affect your quality of life for many years.

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Support to live at home for longer

Getting older doesn’t mean what it used to. We live longer. We’re more active. We want choice in how we live and how we’re supported.

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What Is An Aged Care Assessment?

For many of us, there will come a time when we will need some level of additional care to help us continue to live happy and productive lives.

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Aged Care Assessment Teams

The point at which you decide it’s time to bring others into the decision-making process about care may be some time in coming, or more sudden in the case of a rapid health decline.

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Aged Care Assessment Service

Ageing affects us all in different ways - we may need help with some aspects of our life, while remaining completely independent in others. In order that you can access exactly the right combination of aged care assessment services, a member of a aged care assessment team will need to...

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Care Accommodation (Nursing Homes)

Moving to care accommodation like a nursing home is a big decision and one that can take preparation and planning. This decision can also happen in an instant if there has been an emergency or rapid health decline, and in these instances having the right aged care information at your...

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Care Journey

The DailyCare Journey

The care journey is about giving you an easy and reliable way to find aged care solutions that are right for you and your family.

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Dementia Care

Dealing with dementia in the family

The kinds of behaviours they may show, include:

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Dementia Care Checklist

This checklist provides information on dementia, how to get help, and things to consider when checking out dementia care options.

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Post Operative Care

Post Operative Checklist

This checklist provides information on finding post-op care, getting assessed and what to look for when checking out post-op care facilities.

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Respite Care

Respite Care Checklist

This checklist will help you find the right respite care for your loved one so you can take an essential and well deserved break!

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Home care and residential aged care, explained

The government and aged care

Steps to take before you need care

Why you need an aged care assessment

Income and assets assessment – Centrelink

Financial hardship and veterans’ assistance

Aged Care Glossary